11 August 2017

tips for traveling with a baby

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quite often, i am asked for tips when it comes to traveling with a baby. we have taken our little moses on about thirty flights and to visit to thirteen countries (and six states) – so we certainly have some experience when it comes to this topic … but we are definitely just learning as we go. i’m happy to share what we’ve discovered and what has worked for us!

i feel like traveling with a baby gets such a bad rap – there are so many horror stories out there about dreadful plane rides and ruined plans and lots of work. but ian and i love traveling with a baby and feel that having moses along on our adventures really makes them sweeter in a lot of ways. it’s definitely different, and certainly challenging at times, but it’s also so much fun! surely the experience varies depending on the baby and the parents, but i do wish that traveling with a baby was celebrated more and harped on less. it really can be awesome!
here’s just a few of our tips for traveling with a baby…
  • first and foremost, adjust your expectations. traveling with a baby is fundamentally different than traveling without one. you’ll need to take more stops/breaks, you’ll likely end the nights and start the mornings early, your pace will just be different. go into your trip realizing that you’ll need to be flexible, and that it’s okay if you don’t get to everything on your itinerary/list, and that it’s going to be an adventure :) 
  • remember that different doesn’t mean worse! a lot of times and in a lot of ways it means better! traveling with a baby fosters positive interaction with locals and fellow travelers, and watching your child experience something new is so much fun! and often a slower pace means more savoring of the experience and a deeper appreciation for things seen and done. enjoy all that!
  • pack less as opposed to more. i think sometimes parents traveling with kids want to make sure they have everything their child could possibly want or need from home with them … but having a lot of stuff can really put a damper on travel experiences in our opinion. bring just the bare necessities and know that you can get diapers, wipes. baby food, etc pretty much anywhere … and that babies tend to be entertained by new random objects no matter where you go (they don’t need all their toys from home!). 
  • recognize that kids are resilient, and allow your baby to be adaptable. there’s lots of different parenting styles out there and every parent should do what they feel is best for their baby (and every baby is unique!) – but for what it’s worth we feel that taking on a “go with the flow” type approach really helps keep travel with a baby enjoyable. most babies will be just fine if they break from their routine or need to crawl around on a dirty floor (and then get a thorough wipedown!) or have to get a crying fit out of their system in a public place. 
  • that said, do what you can reasonably do to make sure baby gets fairly regular naps and nighttime sleeping. moses has been an awesome stroller/carrier napper, but we have also occasionally taken breaks in the middle of the day to let him nap in a crib at wherever we are staying. and we nearly always make sure to be in for the night around his regular bedtime (8pm) and do his regular bedtime routine – and i think this has really helped keep our experiences positive.
  • and be flexible yourselves. just roll with it. if there’s exploded poop or overtiredness or tantrums, let your plans evolve and don’t get discouraged :)

    for plane rides:5
  • again, adjust your expectations. not every flight has to be terrible, as the general language around flying with kids may make you think – it really probably will be just fine. but, it’s not going to be the same as flying without a baby! a good part of the flight (especially on a long haul) is going to be work. but truly, it doesn’t have to be awful. i legitimately have had some really fun flights with moses on my lap.  ,
    (obviously it depends greatly on you and on your baby, but i personally think that buying a seat on a plane for a child under two years old is not necessary. even if the experience turns out to be really taxing, you can do anything for a few (or twelve if you’re going a loooong way!) hours. save your money :) )
  • again, bring less as opposed to more. i know you want to be prepared for anything/the worst … but digging through your luggage and squishing your bursting bag under the seat in front of you and loading and unloading everything – it stinks. you need some diapers and wipes, just a few toys, an extra pair of clothes, a baby carrier (more on that below) and comfort items to help your baby sleep. don’t cram more in. 
  • in our experience, “family boarding” is not a good idea when you are traveling with really small kids. you and your baby are going to be stuck in a small contained space for long enough already – so instead of boarding first, board last! use the extra time in the boarding area to let your baby get all his/her wiggles out. 
  • i think this is a pretty well-known tip, but sucking and swallowing will help your baby avoid ear pain when the plane is taking off and landing. breastfeed, bottle feed, or have your baby suck on a pacifier while you’re going up and down. 
  • utilize a baby carrier. wether your baby is brand new or becoming a toddler, strapping him/her on can be a lifesaver on flights, especially when it comes to sleeping. (it’s nearly impossible to sleep yourself if you’re holding your baby in your arms!) when i’ve flown by myself with moses, i have kept the baby carrier on my body the entire flight. having the ability to use two hands is invaluable at times!
  • if you’re going on a long haul flight, utilize the baby bassinets that most airlines have. i didn’t even realize these existed until i had a baby, but they are a total game changer, especially when baby is really little. every airline has different policies when it comes to reserving and using bassinets, so do your research and figure out what you need to do to get one and utilize it. (be aware that some airlines require you to take the baby out of the bassinet – even if they are sound asleep! – when the seatbelt sign comes on.) moses has slept many hours in an airplane bassinet … and also it has been so helpful to just have a place to set him down at times!
  • if your baby is a bit older and quite active, i’ve found that it helps to bring new toys on the plane that have never seen before. in anticipation of our most recent trip to the usa, i went to a store that sells cheap toys (like the dollar store) and picked up a half a dozen new things for moses – and did not let him have even a peek at them until we were on the flight and he was particularly wiggly. i also heard that post-it notes can keep babies entertained for long stretches of time so i brought some of those and little mo was fascinated by them!
  • connected to the point above, don’t underestimate the entertainment value of things already on the plane – like tv controllers, safety brochures, plastic cups, etc. use what’s already there to keep your baby busy and happy. there’s actually quite a lot to explore on a plane and moses has enjoyed being carried up and down aisles to see all different kinds of people and gadgets. also, the bathroom! on most long flights i spend up to thirty minutes with moses playing the in tiny lavatory (making sure there’s not people waiting to use it, of course!) – lots to discover and the mirror is always a hit. 
  • lastly, don’t worry. chill out. seriously, you’re going to be fine. and also, most people are kind and patient and think babies are cute. the vast majority of the fellow travelers on the plane will not notice or totally tune out your babies noises. and if your baby is really annoying someone and you’re doing your very best to be courteous, that’s their problem, not yours. and – the flight will end. i promise. you’ll make it – no matter how challenging it has been (but remember, it really doesn’t have to be super challenging!) :)
i hope this is helpful to someone out there! happy traveling!

41 comments :

  1. Thanks for the positive practical advice on flying with a baby, I've done it a lot as the mama to 4 kids and you are so right! Bring the minimum, use what's there, board last, and 99% of people are happy to help. You and your baby have as much right to fly as they do.

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  2. I do agree with some of these points... HOWEVER You have one kid.... if I traveled with one of my four I would say the same thing.... less is not more when you have a two year old and a four year old and a seven year old... I understand where your coming from by feel like for one kid your right... maybe re-evaluate when little Moses is 3 and you have a colicky baby with acid reflux and we can discuss less is more.... hmmmmm not so much!

    Charity I feel like although your intent came from a good spot... most moms would shake there head at this post...

    On a side note having a baby fly that much and travel that much (comes across as bragging ) it makes your blog seem pretentious.... I mean thirty flights... talk about entitlement.... maybe you should read your parents book...

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    1. thanks for the feedback. i purposely titled this post "tips for traveling with A BABY" - meaning one child that is not a toddler but still a baby :) - and reiterated that phrase throughout the post. i tried to make it clear from the get go that i am not expert but just wanted to share what i have learned - sorry that didn't come across for you. i am SURE it will be a whole new ball game with older/multiple kids!

      also good to know that this came across as pretentious/entitled. i certainly don't fee that way or try to sound that way. i am open to tips on improving on that!

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    2. Good grief. I would much rather gain tips from someone that has been on multiple flights than a few flights. Would you want the surgeon who is day 3 on the job or day 1000?

      I don't think she comes off as pretentious. Travel is something important in their lives and because it is a big part of their lives, it ends up on the blog frequently. That is not a bad thing. Everyone reading this blog has some sort of privilege. Perhaps your privilege is being able to make 4 human beings or having a spouse that is able to drop everything to come to a midday school presentation. It is not wrong to have something great in one's life. I think Charity does a wonderful job of balancing her privilege with service and being open about it on the blog.

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    3. I love hearing about your travels!!

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  3. I remember a flight w/ my baby where he was inconsolable, and the very kind lady in front of us started wiggling a ballpoint pen through the crack between her seat and the window, and he thought it was just hilarious.

    Another tip someone once gave me -- with those new toys on the plane -- wrap each one individually. Unwrapping is an activity in and of itself. It creates a lot of paper, but that can easily be collected, and it was quite entertaining and took a long time!

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  4. Another tip: Travel in clothes they are about to grow out of, or that you wouldn't mind throwing away. Diaper blow out? Wash baby and throw away the clothes. Throw-up or spills? Yeah, not carrying those clothes for 12 more hours in a zip-loc. Disposable bibs are a must too. I think you said this, but spending as much time out of the seat as in the seat helps a lot.

    Lastly, order a special meal for yourself (low-salt, vegetarian, whatever) so you will be served in the first wave, and then have the run of the plane (and bathrooms!) with baby while everyone else is eating.
    Great post!

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  5. 30 flights with a one year old is pretentious... I love to travel with my family... but not to that excess... by blogging about it you open yourself to critics... it's awesome that you travel... I would have left out the 30 flight part it's obnoxious... also the Luxembourg thing also comes across pretty ridiculous... maybe you guys as a family need to get involved in community or keep the ridiculous day trips it'll make you appear much more grounded... your instilling ridiculous ideals for your son... that it's normal to just cross a border to cross of a country on how many countries you've been too... this comes across as pretty ridiculous!

    I like your blog and you have lots of great tips and great blog topics... but for me I can't stand the bragging and yes this is what it comes across as..... soon Moses will be 7 and expecting a trip every weekend and you will think... geeze what an entitled kid. Just saying... your husband should also think about this... maybe he should put the silly conquests on the backburner and take his son to the pool on the weekends or to a dad/son music class... instead of a 16 hr travel day. Sorry charity but needed to speak my mind.

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  6. Hi Charity,
    Even tho I don't have children I found these tips good to pass on to others.

    Something I'm curious about & that is how do you deal with Moses's sleep routines when he's time difference, such as when you were in Utah etc?

    For example, if he goes to bed at 8.00 it would be 1.00 lunch time in Utah. Did you put him to bed at the local time? (8.00 pm Utah time, 3.00 AM UK time. Would he manage to stay awake for that length of time?)

    Also, how do you cope with jet lag?

    I think it's great that you've taken Moses to so many interesting places. He sounds like he's a great traveller.

    Have a lovely weekend. x

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  7. To Anonymous 17:17 - You said you like to travel with your family but not to the excess of 30 trips with a one year old. What about the family who may travel more than that in one year with a one year old? Does that make them MORE 'pretentious'? Every family has their own life and experiences. Maybe someone thinks your family is not traveling enough to give your kids the wonderful experiences that this family chooses to give to their child and to themselves.

    When I read Charity's blog, I am happy for them and love seeing the pictures of all the places they travel. I have never felt like she is bragging. That doesn't come through at all. I believe that is your perception because of your own background or life experiences.

    Speaking as a mother and grandmother, regarding what Moses may be expecting in the future, I know that Charity and Ian will address whatever parenting issues may come up. All children grow and have issues (so do adults) and needed to be taught and guided. Your experiences may be that your husband takes his son to the pool and music classes. That's great! But, not every parent does the same thing with their children - and that's great, too!

    To Anonymous 13:25 - I agree that flying with one baby is so much easier than flying with multiple kids. I have flown out of the country with three grandkids, ages 4 months, 1 1/2, and 5. Whew! So, I chuckled at Charity's experiences, but criticizing her because she hasn't experienced flying with several children is out of place. When you said that most moms would shake their head at this post, I think they would, too, but with a fun, happy heart, knowing that she will learn - and I'm sure she knows she will learn, too. She acknowledges this fact in some of her posts.

    I enjoy Charity's posts! Such a fun, positive family! And, most comments after her posts are positive and supportive of her whether or not they live different life styles or not. Then, there are a handful of comments that criticize her because some think she should think and do the things that are right for them. Can those of you like to criticize someone else because of what you think is "right" just enjoy the things Charity thinks is right for her family. Didn't you ever learn to be supportive of others? This is Charity blog and story. Let her tell it. If you don't like it, don't read it. Go do your own blog the way you want that works for you. We read a beautiful experience That Charity has shared, then get the negative vibes from a very few people. I have wanted to address this issue for years but I don't like to add to the negative or give it more attention. Sorry Charity. I know you always accept the criticism in a positive way and learn from it. You are amazing! It sure would be nice if those who criticize and tell you the 'right way' to do things according to their lifestyle and opinions would politely suggest ideas instead of telling you that you are doing it all wrong and will pay the consequences later.

    Charity, you don't come across as pretentious at all! I love your beautiful family and the things you are able to experience as a family and encourage you to keep doing and sharing! Most people read your blog and never comment. This is my first time. I'm positive that there are hundreds of people who love, love, love this blog and are happy for you and don't feel the need to be negative.

    I don't know you except through your blog, Charity, but hugs to you!

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    1. I love this kind response, and I agree with you wholeheartedly! I love to get a peek into the life that Charity chooses to live and chooses to share so unabashedly.

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    2. Disagree... don't put it on a blog.

      Especially as her parents are tre so called "entitlement trap" authors...

      Maybe a guest post from them would be refreshing... tell us Rick & Linda.... 30 flights for a 1 yr old isn't excessive and slightly entitled.

      Or your son in law's list of countries.... fake fake fake.

      If they believed in their book... they would think that they are entitling Moses from the beginning.... once again when you blog you need to take the positive with the negative.. same with her hubby as she writes about him... living the entitled dream right charity & Ian!?

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    3. Holy cats people. So insane to judge others. Yes, she puts it out on a blog. However, it doesn't hurt others to just say, nope not for me and I simply disagree. But to continue with judgements like, you shouldn't do this, you are entitled, serves you right, gracious. So not needed. If you don't like, then don't do it. If it doesn't work for you, fine, then live your life the way you like. Read the blog take what you want and leave the rest. But leave unkind comments and especially judgemental comments behind. No need for them. Really. I haven't agreed with everything that Charity and her family have done or do. However, I don't find it necessary to judge and offer my opinion on what they should or should not do. So, be kind. Offer kindness and positive comments. Even if you don't agree, you can still be positive in your comments and how you post.

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  8. 30 flights for a 1 yr old is a bit much! And a daytrip to Luxembourg is also ridiculous.... yes you are right that every family has a different experience.... but when you blog you need to take the positive with the negative....

    It does come off as pretentious.....sorry if that makes me mean.... but if your going to write a blog on travel tips and brag about your baby's flight history expect some blowback.

    As I stated I think this blog is fabulous I just can't agree with the bragging on one post and the next on how her poor baby has jet lag...here's an idea don't do 30 flights with a one year old and expect no one to say anything.

    As for the first anon traveling with 4 kids... she's right... one baby is cake... the tips charity gave were good just stop being so dang entitled... maybe give Ian a book on your parents books a daytrip to Luxembourg seems entitled as it gets.... sorry if the truth isn't pretty

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    1. I think this comment is so mean spirited.

      First, Charity says that she has been asked for advice from readers on travel with a baby. Presumably those readers know that she has one baby, not multiple kids. So I think it's fine that she has given advice based on her experience as a mother of one child. It would have been much more pretentious if she had claimed to know all about travelling with a whole bunch of kids.

      Second, the thirty flights thing. I think charity mentioned this to show that her tips are based on some pretty substantial flying experience. I don't think taking all those flights makes her entitled. We all choose to spend our time and money differently. Charity and Ian prioritize travel over other things. That's absolutely fine. Others might choose to buy their kids expensive toys or clothes (Or swimming or music lessons), or to live in a bigger apartment than charity and Ian do.

      Making choices about how you spend the time and money you have doesn't make you entitled. Entitlement is expecting the world to just hand you things, without putting in the work. Ian strikes me as someone who puts in the work for sure - you don't end up with his academic qualifications or with his job unless you have put in some effort. I personally wouldn't choose to spend my day off driving to the border in Luxembourg. But if that's what he enjoys, it's fine for him to choose to use his free time and to spend the money he has earned in that way. It's his day off after all!

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  9. Maybe I need to read the book or maybe I misunderstand the word, but how can Ian be entitled, because he earns his own money and chooses what to do with it?

    I like the tips (also those added by other readers) as I hopefully will fly with my one baby this fall!

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    1. Die Verwendung des Wortes ist nicht ganz richtig – der Sinn ist, so viel sinnloses Reisen sei unangemessen.

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  10. Read the book.... in regards to Moses they are doing everything the book opposes to... and once again if your going to blog and in my opinion (30 flights for a baby... and bragging about it) you need to take the positive with the negative and I think it's too much!

    Share experiences but she could have left out things that cause blowback....read the book... ian and charity I'm sure are decent parents but it's hypocritical to say those 30 flights were all necessary... maybe it makes me mean... but Moses will grow up thinking this is the norm.... Rick & Linda thoughts?

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  11. Oh my GOSSSSH! Those pictures are so, so darling!!!

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  12. What a good traveler Mo is! Good job for taking on these adventures. I would say that if anyone wants to do things like this with your family, whether it's airplane or car travel, make it a priority and part of your family culture. It makes things so much easier. (We have five kids 11, 8, 6, 5, 2 and we've been road tripping since before the oldest was 1)

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    1. you guys are the king and queen of the road trip!! we are coming at you when we start driving for travel more! :)

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  13. thanks all above for your thoughts (and the extra tips - love them!). i completed recognize that in writing a public blog i open myself up to both positive and negative reactions/feedback. i appreciate both being shared!

    i should have made it more clear that my tips are about traveling with just one baby, and that i know things will be very different (and much more challenging!) with multiple and older children. i am probably pretty dang naive about that :)

    ian and i try to make a very conscious effort to make sure our huge privilege to be able to travel often doesn't lead to pretentiousness or entitlement. traveling is how we chose to spend a good chunk our money and time because we feel it is enriching (and because it is fun!). we also endeavor to spend a significant amount of time and money in more service-centered pursuits, many of which i chose not to share on this blog.

    i will have to ask my mom and dad to pipe in on their opinion on my entitlement :)

    thanks again for all the feedback.

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  14. Great post! That post-it note idea is genius! I'm looking forward to trying that one.

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  15. Thanks for the tips! I too have 1 baby (5 mo), so they really help. We've been on 1 flight (just me and the babe) and it went so well - much better than expected. I was surprised by how friendly, helpful and kind all the other passengers were. And my little one enjoyed the plane much more than the car (she doesn't love the car seat!).

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  16. I love your point about accepting that traveling with an infant is different and challenging at times, but that doesn't mean bad! We love traveling with our kids. They are 6,4, and a newborn. We've taken all three on just one trip- and it was exhausting- but absolutely worth it. Traveling can form such great bonds as a family and opens your eyes to so much. I love the education that can happen for my kids when we see something new. From someone who has flown a lot with babies, I think your tips are spot on. I always tell people, just remember, the plane WILL LAND EVENTUALLY! We had one trip where our 23 month old had two raging ear infections (which didn't become apparent until we were in the air)- he screamed for hours and hours and it was stressful, but honestly everyone around us was so nice, especially since they could tell we were trying our best to deal with it. I love hearing about your adventures!

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    1. There should definitely be an option for child-free flights on every airline. I would pay more for this service, and so would a lot of people. I feel for you, but if I had saved up for my vacation of a lifetime and had my long flight spoiled by your screaming kid, I would be really mad. People think everyone is ok with it, because, oh poor kid. But we're not. We are NOT ok with paying so much for a flight and having your kid scream for hours.

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    2. They do actually have child-free flights - it's called a private jet! Welcome to earth - other humans live here!

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    3. I write this as someone who flies a ton and has no children but Tabby - upset kids is a part of life. Agree with Anonymous that private jets would guarantee no crying kids. I would love to go about my day without dealing with crabby and whiny adults, but unfortunately, earth is full of them.

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    4. Oh Tabby, all adults - including you! - were once 'screaming kids'. We've all been there, done that. Sure, upset babies are not always the most pleasant experience, but they also can't regulate their emotions and actions the way adults can and should.

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  17. I love those 4 pictures of your baby!! He is absolutely adorable and what a treasure those pictures are!!

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  18. A friend made me a cool toy for a recent flight with twin 1 year olds. She took an old spice bottle (one with holes in the lid) and filled it with pipe cleaners and straws. My kids adored it and even my super duper wiggly guy sat and played with it for 20+ minutes. You can google it - some people use bigger things like Parmesan cheese shakers, but the small, 8oz spice jar was great because it is so small and doesn't require much space.

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  19. Ah, some of these comments (the overly negative, un-constructive ones) make me giggle and cringe. The saying "agree to disagree" comes to mind, but I guess free speech is something, too :).

    I love your travel tips! My parents also made travel a major priority for my sister and I, granted - not on the scale you and Ian are able to - but still. And I am ever so grateful for it. Quite honestly, travelling helped me to appreciate the world, different people, different cultures, different customs, etc. I know I was lucky, and like you (I believe), I don't take those opportunities for granted. I feel like Moses will likely be raised knowing how lucky he has been, too :).

    Also - travel tips = awesome! We are expecting our first - a baby boy - in 8 weeks. And while worldly travel won't be on our agenda for awhile, the thought of travelling with baby is still something that has crossed my mind! So, the tips are both helpful and very much appreciated :).

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  20. I love how you share all your travel experiences! I think they enrich your life. I actually think that world travel makes you less pretentious because you see so many different cultures and the way humans live in so many different places. It brings you closer to all the people in the world and strengthens your relationship with the human race. I think negative comments reflects the person's inability to communicate they are having a hard time with their current station in life. I also think that traveling outside of the United States is much different. Crossing a country border is like crossing a state border. Keep doing you!! I would hate for you to pull back on posting things because of the few negative comments!

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  21. I did not mean for my comment to be negative. Take your screaming kids anywhere you want. I just stated that I (and probably more people, maybe not willing to admit it) would gladly pay more for either a child-free flight, or a 'quiet' section of a jet.

    Amtrak trains have quiet cars - some people just do not want to hear a screaming baby - nothing negative about that.

    It's just so presumptuous of all of you to think that everyone who is not cursing you and your kid is happy to hear the noise. They smile and say "aw, poor baby", when they would really rather shove him in the overhead bin. Don't kid yourselves (pun intended).

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    1. ... on the flipside, one could say it's presumptuous to think that fellow travelers (adults and kids alike) enjoy being around grumpy adult travelers. Regardless of age, there are imperfect people/travelers everywhere! To each their own, of course, but I'd take an upset child over an grumpy adult any day. Adults CAN control their behavior, children (depending on age) aren't capable (yet) of that responsibility.

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    2. Just curious, why does not wanting to endure a long flight with a baby screaming make someone "grumpy". Parents of kids think that everyone feels the same about their children that they do. We don't. Wanting a quiet calm flight is not being grumpy. What if someone was allowed to bring a squawking bird on the flight and they sat right beside you? And woke up your baby every time he drifted off to sleep. For hours and hours.

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    3. I'm not saying hearing a crying baby on a flight wouldn't make someone grumpy. What I'm saying is in addition to babies, there are very ornery, difficult and sometimes even disrespectful adult travelers who have full control over their behavior but will belittle, berate (choose whichever adjective you'd prefer) others. I've seen and heard adults on planes act a fool - and what I am trying to get at is I find THAT behavior more irritating because adults CAN and SHOULD choose to act appropriately. I was not suggesting adults shouldn't be grumpy when traveling in the vicinity of a crying child. That said - regardless of which type of disruptive traveler bothers you - you can either let it bother you, or put in your earplugs, crank up the music (or distraction of your choosing) and make the best of it.

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    4. As for the squawking bird comment... yep, irritating. To equate a human to a bird is a bit, well, unreasonable. That said, if I was truly irritated enough by consequences of travel (ornery passengers - both kids and adults, squawking birds, etc) I would re-evaluate why I travel. To me, I put up with what I can when traveling because I love to travel. If there are things I don't enjoy, I simply accept it's a part of the process and move on.

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    5. Wow, Tabby, you must not travel much or maybe you just have bad karma - and boy can I see why.

      I have flown over 30 times and I can't remember a time anyone was crying and I don't even have kids.

      Although, I suppose I can see the sentiment of wanting to get away from an annoyance. Man do I just hate rude people....I sure wish they would just get off the internet.

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  22. Hi Charity,

    Thanks for your post! I was hoping to see something like this at some point. I have an 8 week old and we are considering doing a little traveling with him while I am on maternity leave. A couple of things I was wondering about that you didn't cover are on the more practical side. First, did you bring a pack and play or travel crib with you? Seems like a bulky item. If not, what did Moses sleep in? Not sure about in the U.K., but here in the US they scare you half to death about SIDS and emphasize separate, safe sleep spaces. Second, were you still nursing while wearing the carrier on the plane? I have the baby Bjorn One (like you), and I can't see how it is possible to nurse and wear that at the same time. Maybe it was for shorter flights? I am also wondering what you do/did about car seats and safe transport in automobiles. Thanks so much! It's good to see examples of parents not ending all fun things in life just because they have a baby. I think the idea that you should just give up all things that gave you happiness (like travel) just because you have a baby is what leads to many cases of post partum depression.

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    1. for sleeping - we use this pop-up tent (and have since moses was tiny): https://www.kidco.com/product/travel-products/peapod-plus/
      it fits easily in our luggage and has been fantastic. we don't always bring it though - most hotels will provide a crib for a baby so we always check first with the place(s) we are staying.
      on nursing on the plane, if ian is not with me i just figure out a way to slip one side of the carrier off so i can access the breast for feeding. it's tricky, but doable.
      on car seats: we don't have a car (so use car seats only when traveling), so we bought super cheap/lightweight car seats from amazon (we just recently had to size up) and we bring one with us when traveling places where we will be in a car. we have also rented car seats, but that gets pretty pricey after a few times.
      also, the stroller we chose is incredibly good for traveling - the babyzen yoyo. folds up tiny (can fit in the overhead bin!), is super lightweight but still durable.

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